Not Drinking or Getting High? No problem.

Pretty much every movie about college plays on the stereotypical party scenes. Do those kinds of parties happen sometimes? Sure. But the vast majority of college students choose not to drink or be high most of the time.

Don’t believe us? Here are some selected stats from UNC’s National College Health Assessment. This is a survey done by campuses throughout the country to learn about health trends. These numbers are from UNC only.

38% of students report NO use of alcohol in the past two weeks.

89% of students report no use of marijuana in the past two weeks.

96% of students report no use of other drugs in the past 3 months.

Whoa.

But numbers are numbers. Experiences matter too – and in my experience (I got my undergrad degree at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, a top party school then and now), I knew no person who was drunk or high all the time. We all were sober at least sometimes – some of us more than others.

Here’s what I learned:

1. Own your choices (and it’s ok to keep a drink in your hand).

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Most advice on staying sober at parties begins with how to hide that you are sober. “Keep a drink in your hand,” or “drink club soda with a twist and say it’s a vodka tonic,” are advice often given to those who aren’t drinking. Adhering to these suggestions lets you exist among less-than-discerning drunks without them noticing your lack of intoxication. But it also facilitates the false narrative that everyone is drinking – and the only way to have fun is to drink.

Pretending to drink can be an easier entry into the world of partying sober, so if you are feeling uncomfortable without something in your hand, by all means, get yourself a non-alcoholic beverage.

But, if the folks you’re hanging out with are uncomfortable with you being sober, that’s on them. Show the world that you can still have fun sober! Talk about why you are making the decision – whether it’s for tonight or forever.  “I’m training for a marathon,” “I don’t like losing control,” “I find that I enjoy myself more when I’m sober,” “I am in recovery,” or “I just don’t drink/use” –  whatever your reason is, own it. There’s no shame in that choice – again, EVERYONE chooses to be sober sometimes.

2. Find your people.

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My friends are the kind of people who (regardless of sobriety) wear costumes, storm empty dance floors and sing while biking home. I have self-conscious friends too, but I always gravitated towards those folks who could be publicly silly. Those are my kind of people – who are yours?

I promise there are people at UNC who have ideas similar to yours about what makes for fun and connection. Notice the students who don’t participate in the all-night beer pong or those who avoid getting high – befriend them. Make some friends through mutual interests like sports or student orgs. People dedicated to training or pursuing an interest likely have less interest in partying.

3. Have fun!

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Some of my favorite memories of partying from college came from the anticipation of a party – hanging out in our dorm room, getting dressed, listening to music, and eating dinner together. Get excited for going out even when you’re not using drugs and alcohol. And once you’re at the party, enjoy yourself! The parties I went to sober often included plenty of folks who were not sober, which meant that the main thing holding me back from being my outgoing, silly self was me. I soon realized I could be sober and have a great time. Really.

4. Do things besides party.

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When I do party, I usually play games or dance. Standing around and chatting never held much interest for me. So finding fun ways to interact while sober came naturally to me. Here are some things I did in college besides party:

  • Concerts. I saw some great bands live – many for free! – while in college.
  • Break bread. Eating together is the ultimate community-builder. Host a potluck or visit a favorite local restaurant.
  • Enjoy a live sports game. My friends and I became the loud fans at every home volleyball game. By the end of my time as an undergrad, we knew most of the players and had spent hours of enjoyment cheering on our team (and gently heckling the other teams). We liked volleyball because one voice could be heard throughout the gym – but any sport will do. UNC has an amazing men’s basketball team (duh) AND loads of other amazing D1 and club sports teams who would love for you to become their biggest fans.
  • Play!  I had friends who kept a running tally of their card game scores on the walls in their dining room. We loved playing games together – intramural and pickup sports, board games, cards, charades, sardines (it’s like reverse hide and seek! And super fun to play in public spaces). Create or find opportunities for the activities you find fun without substances and encourage others to do them with you!
  • Host parties that revolve around doing something besides drinking or getting high. Schedule a mystery night, plan party games that require skill and critical thinking, show movies, run a book club, hold a cooking competition, etc. When people are focused on an actual activity rather than simply gathering, there is often a lot less pressure to drink and a lot more pressure to stay focused on the tasks at hand.

Remember, we all came to college with a goal in mind. Keep your eyes on the prize!  For more information around alcohol decisions visit alcohol.unc.edu.

If alcohol and drugs are getting in the way of your goals, you can always connect with Student Wellness to talk about strategies to reduce your risk.

And y’all are our best resource. If you have other ideas to share with UNC students on this topic – send ’em our way!

This article was written by Sara Stahlman, Marketing and Communication Coordinator for UNC Campus Health Services. 

Roommate Conversation Guide for COVID

a guide to talking with your roommates about COVID expectations 

Your home should feel like a safe space. And yet, most of us have at least slightly different calculations about risk, so living with roommates means one roommate’s behavior sometimes results in another roommate feeling vulnerable to COVID.

Remember that good communication including active listening is the best strategy for navigating conflict. Problems arise when people feel scared or worried, but either don’t have conversations or feel unheard when they try to talk about things. So open up a dialogue about COVID today.

Opening question

What are your thoughts about COVID-19 right now? 

Understand current and anticipated behaviors

Such as risk reduction strategies, socializing, transportation 

  • What behaviors are you practicing to reduce the risk of COVID transmission? Specifically…
    • When/where do you practice physical distancing?  
    • When/where do you wear a mask? 
    • What are your handwashing tendencies? 
    • When do you interact with people without a mask and who are those people? What do you know about their precautionary behaviors? What is the setting for these encounters – indoor/outdoor? How long do you typically interact?
    • Have you attended any large gatherings during the pandemic, and will you this semester?  
    • How frequently do you tend to clean and disinfect your/our space? 
  • What risks do you anticipate this semester?
    • What are unavoidable risks in your life – such as work or classrooms?  
    • How will you transport yourself around town and campus?  
    • Do you have plans to travel this semester?  
    • As restaurants and bars reopen, what are your plans?   
    • How often do you plan to visit, stay with, or host family, significant other, or friends?  
    • How often do you plan to be home in our shared dwelling? 
  • What additional COVID safety precautions do you practice? 

Get a sense of health needs

  • Have you been diagnosed with COVID? If so, when and how does it impact your behavior now?  
  • Has someone you care about been diagnosed with COVID? If so, when and does it impact your behavior now? 
  • Are you in a vulnerable population as outlined by the CDC? 

Make a household plan

  • How will we adapt our space and behaviors to adjust for COVID? 
  • How will we adapt our food behaviors during the semester? 
  • How will we adapt our cleaning and chores?  
  • Who is allowed inside the residence? How will we handle friends or family who have interest in coming to or gathering at our residence? 
  • How will we transport ourselves around town and campus? 
  • If at least one roommate deems something unsafe, are we all willing to honor that?  
  • If one of us has symptoms or tests positive for COVID, what is our mutually agreed upon plan of action? 
  • Under what circumstances will we be willing to quarantine for the benefit of our room/household? 
  • If UNC becomes fully remote during the semester, what will we do? Return to a family home, stay in our shared dwelling, or something else? 
  • Are there other topics we should discuss (dating, mail pickup, mask disinfecting plan, remembering to take our masks, vaccination when it becomes available)? 

SAMPLE COVID ROOMMATE AGREEMENT 

We, the residents of ___________________ agree to the following from ___(date)_____ to ____(date)____: 

Dwelling visitors – who is allowed into our home, when, in what circumstances, how long:  

Gatherings – hosting, attending, indoor/outdoor, common areas: 

Cleaning – sharing responsibilities, extra disinfection, dishes, laundry: 

Food – sharing, group meals, restaurants, grocery shopping: 

Transportation – how will we get around, car riding with non-roommates: 

Testing – who will be tested and when: details for UNC required and voluntary testing at carolinatogether.unc.edu/carolina-together-testing-program 

If a roommate is a close contact to a known positive, we will… 

If a roommate tests positive, we will… 

If there is a conflict between these agreements and behavior, we will… 

We plan to revisit these agreements on ___(date)____ to review and revise as necessary. 

Signed: ______________

When Conflict Arises

Remember, that conflict is likely to occur even after going through a conversation like this. When conflict happens, stay calm and:

  • Express specific observations about a situation or concern rather than your judgments or evaluation. Ex. “I saw that you were hanging out with friends without masks and were closer than 6 feet from each other. We agreed that we wouldn’t do that during the pandemic.”
  • Disclose your feelings about the situation or concern. Provide a genuine understanding of your emotions and sensations, not your beliefs about what you think others have done to you. Ex. “I felt scared and exposed when I saw you.”
  • Identify what you need or value. Ex. “I really value shared agreements about behavior – especially during a pandemic.”
  • Request specific actions that would start to meet your needs or support your values. Avoid demanding character changes or stating ultimatums. Ex. “Would you be willing to revisit our agreements together and update them as needed?”

Creating a Culture of Consent- SAAM

Creating a Culture of Consent

Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) is an annual campaign observed in April to raise public awareness about sexual assault.  Our goal at UNC is to educate communities and individuals on how to prevent sexual violence.  This year’s theme centers around consent. 

Show Support

SAAM- APRIL 2020We all play a role in cultivating Carolina culture and creating a space where consent is practiced daily. This month there are a series of fun opportunities to learn more about consent culture and show your support for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. You can get involved all month long by participating in a variety of virtual consent events, including trivia, trying new recipes and even watching Netflix.

Connect more with Sexual Assault Awareness

Be entered to win by completing the the Consent Crossword and the SAAM Loyalty Card.

Consent Crossword Complete the crossword and email letstalkaboutit@unc.edu for one stamp. 

SAAM Loyalty Card Participate in a virtual SAAM event and then email letstalkaboutit@unc.edu for one stamp. Each opportunity that you complete can earn you one stamp, as can one completion of the consent crossword. A full loyalty card (5 stamps) gives you a chance to win an Amazon Fire Stick. See all available SAAM loyalty opportunities here.

SAAM Loyal card

Take this April to shower those around you with consent, good vibes, and love (from a physical distance). Stay tuned for more SAAM information on HealthyHeels.org & Safe.unc.edu.

 

University Resources:

  • The Gender Violence Services Coordinators (GVSC):  meeting with folks via phone or secure video chat. To schedule a time to connect with Holly or Kayla you can email them at gvsc@unc.edu (Confidential Resource)
  • Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS): you can connect with CAPS via their 24/7 hotline at 919-966-3658 (Confidential Resource)
  • Campus Health: open for students and specifically still providing care for SANE exams – call 919-966-2281 (Confidential Resource)
  • Equal Opportunity and Compliance Office: our Report and Response Coordinators, who are the intake specialists for our Title IX office are still meeting with individuals remotely. To schedule a time to connect with Rebecca, Ew, or Kathryn email: reportandresponse@unc.edu  (Private Resource)
  • Student Wellness: you can connect with SW via email, Studentwellness@unc.edu and get involved with other violence prevention initiatives

Local Resources:

National Resources:

  • The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free: 1-800-799-7233 and through chat.
  • The National Sexual Assault Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free: 800.656.HOPE (4673) and through chat.
  • The StrongHearts Native Helpline for domestic/sexual violence is available 7am-10pm CT, confidential, and specifically for Native communities: 1−844-762-8483
  • The Trans LifeLine for peer support for trans folks 9am-3am CT: 1-877-565-8860 This hotline is staffed exclusively by trans operators is the only crisis line with a policy against non-consensual active rescue.
  • National Parent Helpline Monday -Friday 12pm-9am CT emotional support and advocacy for parents: 1-855-427-2736

 

When Home Isn’t Safe: COVID-19 and Interpersonal Violence

This is an unprecedented time for all of us. Uncertainty is rampant and public health officials are all recommending we engage in social distancing. For some folks, social distancing might not look much different than their normal weekend routine: pajamas all day, netflix, and lots of chill time. But for some of the most vulnerable, social distancing can be challenging and even dangerous.

Folks who are experiencing or have experienced gender-based violence (sexual violence, relationship violence, stalking) might be feeling increased isolation and loss of control during this time where answers are limited and the advice to stay home is unanimous. When power and control are the root causes of violence, and isolation is a key tactic of abuse, this time can be triggering for folks who already have experienced these things at the hands of an abuser. Even more, some folks who are being encouraged to stay home might currently be in an abusive relationship with a domestic partner, roommate, family member, or other person at their home.

For this reason, home might not be the safest place for all of our community members.

While this is our reality and is important to name, advocates and staff at UNC-CH are working tirelessly to make sure that our community has the resources and support that it needs during this pandemic.

You are not alone.

From university resources to state and national resources, we are here to support our most vulnerable and to specifically address the unique challenges that survivors of Gender-based violence will be facing during the era of COVID-19.

Let’s start with University resources. While classes have been moved to virtual platforms, campus staff are also hard at work to find creative ways to make our unique services and resources available for our community.

University Resources:

  • The Gender Violence Services Coordinators (GVSC):  meeting with folks via phone or secure video chat. To schedule a time to connect with Holly or Kayla you can email them at gvsc@unc.edu (Confidential Resource)
  • Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS): you can connect with CAPS via their 24/7 hotline at 919-966-3658 (Confidential Resource)
  • Campus Health: open for students and specifically still providing care for SANE exams – call 919-966-2281 (Confidential Resource)
  • Equal Opportunity and Compliance Office: our Report and Response Coordinators, who are the intake specialists for our Title IX office are still meeting with individuals remotely. To schedule a time to connect with Rebecca, Ew, or Kathryn email: reportandresponse@unc.edu  (Private Resource)

Local Resources:

National Resources:

  • The National Domestic Violence Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free: 1-800-799-7233 and through chat.
  • The National Sexual Assault Hotline is 24/7, confidential and free: 800.656.HOPE (4673) and through chat.
  • The StrongHearts Native Helpline for domestic/sexual violence is available 7am-10pm CT, confidential, and specifically for Native communities: 1−844-762-8483
  • The Trans LifeLine for peer support for trans folks 9am-3am CT: 1-877-565-8860 This hotline is staffed exclusively by trans operators is the only crisis line with a policy against non-consensual active rescue.
  • National Parent Helpline Monday -Friday 12pm-9am CT emotional support and advocacy for parents: 1-855-427-2736

 

Beyond resources, we want to also provide some guidance for folks who are feeling like their home is not the safest place for them right now. As some states and cities move to require folks to shelter in place, we are aware that this might create additional difficulties and risks for survivors. Here are some things to think through if we receive “shelter in place” guidance from State or local authorities.

If home is not a safe place for you, are there other friends or family you could stay with during this time? Consider reaching out to these people to make a plan:

  • Consider reaching out to a trusted friend, co-worker, or family member who could check in with you about your safety and support needs. If you need help identifying support people in your life, take a look at the pod mapping worksheet from the Bay Area Transformative Justice Collective.
  • Are you connected with close friends or family members of the person who is hurting you? Are they aware of what is happening or are they a safe person to reach out to? Consider connecting with them now in case you need someone to help you in an emergency.

We’ve pulled this list from Futures Without Violence. Check out their page to learn more.

The Gender Violence Services Coordinators offer safety planning as part of their support, so this might be an option for folks who are concerned about their safety in their place of residence.

Overall, know that you are not alone in this. Our community is rallying in amazing ways and coming together to support the most vulnerable among us. If you have needs yourself or are looking out for a friend, please take the proactive step of reaching out to any of these resources!

As activist and amazing human Helen Keller once said, “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.”

 

This blog was written by Viviane Linos, Interpersonal Violence Prevention Programs Coordinator. With a focus on addressing root causes of violence and creating lasting cultural change, Viviane has dedicated the past 6 years to efforts in the professional, scholarly, and advocacy realms of violence prevention.  Receiving her bachelors in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies from Butler University in Indianapolis and then her Masters in Women and Gender Studies from Arizona State University, she has a unique theoretical perspective which she brings to the Student Wellness team at Carolina.

New Safety Warnings Regarding Vaping

VapeAs of October 8, 2019, there have been 1299 confirmed cases of vaping-related pulmonary impairment and 26 reported deaths in the United States. Two-thirds of cases are between the ages of 18-34 years old. The exact cause of these illnesses is unknown and still under investigation.

The CDC currently recommends to avoid vaping any substances. Additionally, do NOT purchase vaping products off the streets as formulations may have been altered.

Interested in quitting? Follow these steps:

Set A Quit Date

✅  Make sure it’s realistic. Give yourself time to prepare. You must be physically and mentally ready. Set yourself up for success by establishing a goal and determining WHY quitting is important to you.

Learn Your Triggers/Resist Temptations

✅ This may consist of feelings, people, situations, etc. that tempt you to vape. Attempt to avoid until temptations have disappeared. This may include modifying your normal routine. If avoiding is not an option, prepare for handling triggers. Prepare for cravings and withdrawal.

Make The Mental Shift

✅ Think positive. Imagine your future healthy life without vaping. Make a list of all the benefits you will receive from quitting. It may take time to get used to your new life-style, but will soon become your new normal.

Surround Yourself With Supportive People

  1. Tell your friends and family. They are on your side!
  2. Make an appointment at Campus Health with one of our providers.
  3. Call QuitlineNC – telephone service is 24/7 at 1-800-QUIT-NOW or register online
  4. Access the QuitlineNC WebCoach available 24 hours a day online
  5. Text DITCHJUUL to 88709 to get support from Truth Initiative experts. This program has helped 800,000 people quit their vaping habits.

 

Details from this article were collected from the CDC website.

https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2019/s-1010-vaping-injury-update.html Published Oct. 10, 2019.

Written by Sarah Garfinkle, PharmD Candidate in the Eschelman School of Pharmacy

 

Other than Salt-n-Pepa, does anybody actually talk openly and honestly about sex?

sexual communicationOther than Salt-n-Pepa, does anybody actually talk openly and honestly about sex? Turns out the answer is YES for Carolina students!  91% of UNC-Chapel Hill first years say they’d communicate with a partner about what they want in a sexual situation.  Now, we know that all first- years are not the same; different groups of students have different attitudes and beliefs. However, interestingly enough this statistic doesn’t change a whole lot across different gender identities, races, and sexual orientations (ranges from 88%-93%).

 

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Alicia Keys Photo by Intel Free Press, Flickr Creative Commons

Not convinced?  Famous musical artists across the decades would agree with 91% of UNC first-years, and have rather good advice and examples of how to communicate about sex. Salt-n-pepa kicks us off with the obvious, “let’s talk about sex, baby, let’s talk about you and me”. Coldplay chimes in about getting it on with, “Turn your magic on, to me she’d say ,…  ‘Oh you make me feel like I’m alive again’”  John Legend and Marvin Gaye (respectively) ask for affirmative verbal consent singing, “I just need permission, so give me the green light” and “I’m asking you baby to get it on with me, I ain’t gonna worry, I ain’t gonna push, won’t push you baby”.  Lauryn Hill talks about what she likes singing, “The sweetest thing I’ve ever known is your kiss upon my collar bone.” And then there’s Alicia Keys showing us how to set some boundaries, “There’s an attraction we can’t just ignore, but before we go too far across the line I gotta really make sure that I’m really sure.”

 

 

 

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Coldplay Photo by pinero.beatriz, Flickr Creative Commons

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John Legend Photo by Fantasy Springs, Flickr Creative Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking of talking about sex… what does “sex” refer to anyways?  Study after study after study has shown that everyone defines sex very differently.  So, for the remainder of this blog, we’re going to focus on “sexual behavior/ activity”, which can include wide a range of behaviors done with ourselves or others including hugging, kissing, vaginal sex, holding hands, oral sex, abstinence, (mutual ) masturbation, different forms of physical intimacy, anal sex, the list goes on.  Some people have oral/ anal/ vaginal sex, other people are sexual in other ways, and some other people choose to abstain from some/ all of these things! Side note: it turns out lots of UNC students are abstaining in lots of different ways as well; click here to learn more! Moral of the story is, no matter what kinds of sexual behaviors you are or aren’t engaging in with other people, learning to talk about wants/needs and boundaries is important, and practice can help. 

Back to the point. If someone is interested in being sexually active, or is sexually active, why does everyone think talking about it with the people involved is such a good idea?  The long and short: talking means everyone is on the same page and everyone will have a better experience if there is clear communication. Loveisrespect.org would say that you’re the only person who knows what’s on your mind, so your partner won’t know unless you say it!  Along the same lines, you can’t know what your partner is thinking or wanting until you ask them and talk about it. We don’t always know how to talk about sexual activity, especially since we don’t always see representations of this in the media, and because we don’t often learn about how to communicate on this topic in school or from our families. However, it’s important for everybody to talk about what they like, don’t like, and what their boundaries are.  It’s also super important to listen to your partner, and respect the things they say and the boundaries they set.  Even if they have previously consented to intimacy, but do not desire to this time. This will show the person that what they say matters to you, and they’re more likely to trust you and listen to you as a result.

Some people think talking about being sexual is for folks in serious, long-term, committed relationships, however, this is just as, if not more, important for people who choose to have casual/ short-term sexual interactions! Why’s that?  Casual/ short-term sexual interactions often occur between people who don’t know each other well, and/or are interacting sexually for the first time.  Therefore, talking about expectations, limits and boundaries for sex (in ways that are comfortable, clear, and sexy) is even more important to make sure everybody is on the same page and having an equally positive experience. There are also people who choose to abstain from some or all sexual behaviors.  Do they need to talk about being sexual?  Absolutely!  Making sure there are clear lines of communication about what everyone wants in these situations is more important than ever so that everyone’s boundaries are understood and respected.

Sound hard/ challenging/ uncomfortable?  It’s easier (and sexier) than it sounds!  And, if someone knows what you like (and you know what they like), and everyone knows what’s on and off the table, it’ll be a lot more safe and satisfying, too. Here are some phrases our sexual wellness counselors recommend to get you started!

  • Do you want to…?
  • How would you feel about…?
  • How far do you see things going?
  • What do you want to do?
  • Would you like it if I…?
  • I want to…
  • I don’t want to…
  • That sounds amazing
  • Nope, not for me
  • I’m down to do… but I’m not into …

Still perplexed? Click here to take a free online course about creating and sustaining healthy relationships, INCLUDING skills around how to communicate and talk about sex in healthy ways. While the information is applicable to people of all sexual orientations and gender identities, these modules are centered on the experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Trans*, Intersex, Queer, Questioning, Two Spirit, and Same Gender Loving communities. Whether you are looking to strengthen your own relationship skills or support others in their relationships—this course is for you!

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Have additional specific questions?  Make a free private SHARE appointment to talk about talking about sex.SHARE

We encourage you to think about one way you or a friend could communicate about healthy relationships and sex in an open and positive way.  If you or your friend feels uncomfortable talking about this, remember that 91% of your peers and several pop stars have your back and support talking it out! Continue reading

What Is One Act?

What are Intervention and Prevention?

These two words are thrown around pretty frequently when it comes to violence prevention work, and it is important to understand them before we discuss One Act. Imagine that you are sitting on a riverbank and suddenly a drowning person comes floating down the river, struggling to keep their head above water. You save them, but before you can catch your breath, another person comes drowning down the river, then another and another! Instead of saving each individual person, you run upstream to see why so many people are coming down the river. In this analogy, saving the people drowning can be viewed as intervention work while running upstream to solve the problem can be viewed as prevention work (CDC). Both intervention and prevention are equally important in the field of ending violence.

How One Act Changed My View of Bystander Intervention

One Act is a bystander intervention training that teaches people how to identify warning signs of violence and find safe ways to intervene. Before I attended, I had a very specific idea of what that meant. To me, it meant being at a large, loud party and noticing one person making advances that may be unwanted onto another person, things potentially getting physical, and then someone stepping in to try to prevent a violent situation from unfolding. While this example of violence prevention certainly occurs, it is not the only kind of scenario that One Act addresses.

One Act addresses risky situations including the party scenario I previously mentioned, as well as potentially less obvious situations including noticing a friend exhibiting signs of experiencing mental, physical, emotional, or financial abuse from a partner. One Act incorporates both aspects of prevention and early intervention into its training while also addressing healthy relationships, campus and community resources, and consent.

One Act treats everyone as an active bystander with the potential to prevent or stop violence. I like how One Act offers students’ different ways to intervene based on their identity, personality, and level of comfort intervening in a potentially dangerous situation. One Act really emphasizes ‘meeting people where they are’ and recognizes that not everyone feels safe intervening in the same way, which is why they offer options.

The One Act Model

One Act and One Act for Greeks are on-campus trainings that offer participants the skills to intervene in the situations mentioned previously. The trainings teach participants to be active bystanders all of the time, for strangers at parties as well as for friends and family. The training outlines a 4-step process of dealing with a risky or unsettling situation where you suspect violence or a potential for violence:

  1. Observe
  2. Assess
  3. ACT
  4. Follow Up

One Act acknowledges that every bystander and every situation is different and therefore provides multiple options on how to act. The ACT acronym offers the options:

A – Ask for Help

C – Create a Distraction

T – Talk Directly

One Act on Campus:

Preventing violence sounds like a big, daunting task, but One Act breaks it down into small, doable actions that can make a huge difference. It can be as simple as asking a friend how their new relationship is going, if they feel safe with their partner, or just making yourself available to talk if they ever want to. Outside of trainings, One Act also holds several events on campus to spread awareness for violence prevention. One such event is Dos and Donuts, which is held in both the Fall and Spring semesters. Dos and Donuts offers donuts to students who participate in activities promoting healthy relationships, checking in with friends and family, and self-care. This event helps students who have not been One Act trained learn to be an active bystander in their own lives.

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Here is our Healthy Relationship Donut! We asked students ‘what makes a relationship sweet’ and they added their sprinkle to the donut. Check out more pictures from the event here: https://www.facebook.com/pg/OneAct/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1367790649927800

My Final Thoughts:

One Act gives students the knowledge, skills, and confidence to recognize early warning signs of violence, and teaches them how to take steps to prevent that violence from unfolding. Students who have attended One Act have said that they are more willing to engage in conversations regarding sexual assault and consent since being trained.

I have learned so much since being One Act trained and since working with the program this semester and I strongly believe that this training has and will continue to contribute to a safer UNC-CH environment. I believe that everyone in the Carolina community should get One Act trained in order to foster an environment of looking out for and helping one another.

You can find the dates of our Spring trainings and sign up for information or a training here: https://studentwellness.unc.edu/oneact

This blog post was written by Rachel Maguire, One Act’s Fall 2016 Social Media Intern. Rachel is a third year Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies double major who became involved with One Act through the WMST 340: Violence in Leadership Prevention class.

How is HIV different than AIDS? An HIV primer

This year marks 35 years since AIDS was first recognized by the CDC. News of the highly-fatal AIDS epidemic was initially met with profound concern, panic and confusion. Still today, there are plenty of misconceptions about what HIV and AIDS are, and who is affected.  In honor of World AIDS Day, we’ll provide an abbreviated history of the discovery of HIV and AIDS, discuss how they’re different, and talk about how you can get tested for FREE!

AIDS and HIV: A super-duper brief history

In 1981, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) received several reports of a rare cancer, typical only among those with severely compromised immune systems and the elderly, among young gay men. Suspecting that there may be other factors at-play, the CDC began an investigation. At this stage of the epidemic, there was no identifiable cause and no single name for the phenomenon. Various organizations referred to it with different names, among them “gay-related immune deficiency” (GRID).  As the epidemic spread, it became clear that several groups were affected, including injection drug users, hemophiliacs and Haitians.  The CDC proposed using a unifying name for the condition, as there was mounting evidence that it was not limited to the gay community. In 1982, with over 400 cases reported globally, the CDC proposed the term “Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome” or (AIDS). Around the same time, cases of mother-to-child transmissions of AIDS were reported, and a child who had received blood transfusions also appeared to have developed AIDS. Cases of AIDS among women who have sex with men were recorded. All of these cases provided evidence that an infectious agent was likely responsible for AIDS, and suggested several possible routes of transmission: through blood, breast milk, and sexual activity. In 1986, at least five years after AIDS cases were initially reported, the name for the virus that causes AIDS was born: “Human Immunodeficiency Virus”, or HIV.

AIDS vs. HIV?

The history of AIDS and HIV helps clarify how and why they’re different. Contrary to the widespread belief, HIV is not a disease. It is a virus – but a pretty serious one. Our bodies are able to fight off other viruses like the common cold, but for some reason, we just can’t rid our bodies of HIV. Our immune system is comprised of various types of cells, each having special roles to fight off infections. HIV attacks one such cell, the CD4 cell. The higher your CD4 cell count, the stronger your immune system is and the better you are at fighting infections. HIV attacks our CD4 cells by entering them and becoming part of their life cycle. Think of…mind control. When HIV takes over a CD4 cell, it no longer thinks it is a CD4 cell. When the CD4 cell (with its brain taken over by the virus) tells itself to ‘replicate,’ HIV replicates. This leads to an increase in HIV, a decrease in CD4, and a compromised immune system. If the CD4 cell count drops significantly, an individual has AIDS, or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.

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Image from http://aids.gov

AIDS refers to a syndrome, meaning the presence of clinical features or phenomena (example:  weakened immune system). HIV is a necessary but not sufficient cause of AIDS. In other words, HIV infection always precedes AIDS, but HIV doesn’t always develop into AIDS. HIV can be detected with a variety of tests that identify either HIV itself or circulating HIV antibodies. AIDS diagnosis is more complicated, and requires the presence of certain signs and symptoms, such as decreased white blood cell count and certain  AIDS-defining illnesses.

Who gets HIV?
Given that HIV can be transmitted through sex, contaminated sharp instruments or breastfeeding, almost all individuals are at risk. HIV transcends geographic, socioeconomic, political, racial, and gender boundaries. Some individuals have a higher risk than others depending on how often they are exposed to the following four fluids that transmit HIV: blood, vaginal fluid, semen and breast milk.

A person’s sexual network (a group of people one individual is connected to through sexual contact), which may be influenced by race, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation, may also influence his/her/zir risk for contracting HIV. Think of it in terms of probability. Let’s say Person A is an African American man who has sex with other men, and Person B is a White man who does not have sex with other men. Person A has a smaller number of potential sexual partners than Person B. In other words, Person A has a smaller sexual network. In terms of numbers, this means that if someone in Person A’s network becomes infected with HIV, he has a higher chance of also becoming infected even if he engages in the exact same level of “risky sexual behavior” as Person B.

HIV Prevention and Treatment
The key to prevention is education. With a lack of education about the truth, millions of individuals become infected because they believe HIV can’t impact them. In reality, specific communities have higher infection rates due to historical inequitable access to care and modern institutions that keep these communities at a lower socioeconomic status which maintains unequal access to care. Treatments for HIV exist, but are expensive.

Other than breaking down myths (which the Center for Aids Research is excellent at doing!), everyone needs to understand risks of sexual transmission BEFORE they put themselves in high-risk situations. The four fluids of HIV transmission (do you remember what they are? Blood, vaginal secretions, semen, and breast milk) along with education on proper condom use help prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections and diseases -and (bonus!) unintended pregnancy. Everyone who has sex should get tested once a year or before embarking on a new sexual encounter, whichever comes first. Testing should be a regular part of healthy relationships.

HIV Testing

In honor of World AIDS Day, Student Wellness is hosting a FREE, walk-in HIV testing event in the Carolina Union from 10AM-4:45PM on December 1st (TODAY!). Please see our event page for more information. Additionally, at UNC Campus Health Services, we offer a rapid oral test (results available in about 20 minutes), and a blood test available every weekday. More information about HIV testing at UNC is available on the Campus Health webpage; for more information about making an HIV appointment with Student Wellness call 919.962.9355.

 

This post was compiled and updated based on two previous Healthy Heels blog posts, one written by Diana Sanchez, a PhD student in Public Health Epidemiology in 2012 and the other written by Jani Radhakrishnan, a MPH and City and Regional Planning Master’s Student. Both writers served as graduate student staff with wellness at UNC. 

Crisis Plans or “Mad Maps”: Creating Your Own Path Through Mental Health Crisis

In 2015, 18% of UNC students surveyed reported that anxiety had interfered with their school performance in the past year and 13% said depression had affected school in the same period. People with depression and anxiety are at an increased risk for experiencing mental health crisis, which is “any situation in which a person is not able to resolve the situation with the skills and resources available” (source). Crisis can feel like being so overwhelmed that it seems impossible to accomplish daily tasks, being suicidal, or being out-of-touch with reality, in the case of psychosis. Because UNC students experience depression and anxiety, we need to take care of our own and our friends’ mental health so that we all stay healthy, safe, and out of crisis. This post will help you learn about crisis-planning, which is one tool you can use to keep you and your community safe.

What is a Crisis Plan?

A crisis plan is a plan you create that guides you and the people around you to prevent mental health crisis, and respond to crisis effectively if it happens. Think of a crisis plan as a letter from your calm, reflective self to your future, struggling self, and the people who will support you then. Crisis plans are often documents that include information about what triggers you to feel emotional distress, what helps you feel better, and who to reach out to for support.  Your crisis plan uses your wisdom and knowledge of your own needs to guide your future self through hard times and back to stability.

How do I Make a Crisis Plan?

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“Subway Style Mind Map,” by Sharon Brogan. Courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Your crisis plan can be as simple or complex as you like, and it can include any information you think would be relevant to your future self and your support people–everything from when your friends should feed your cats to what metal songs you like to cry to.

This is one great crisis plan template you can use.

The Icarus Project, the radical mental health collective, refers to its crisis planning tool, available here, as Mad Maps. The Icarus Project’s mission is to “advance social justice by fostering mutual aid practices that reconnect healing and collective liberation,” so its Mad Maps guide includes questions like “what does oppression feel like to you?”

Crisis plans can also be in the form of:

  • A psychiatric advanced directive, a legal document you can complete that will inform healthcare professionals how to best support you in the event that you are hospitalized for mental health reasons. Advance directives are intended for healthcare providers to read, so they include information like what medications you should and shouldn’t be given, and which of your support people doctors should communicate with about your care.
  • self-care boxes with actual stuff in them that helps you feel better
  • lists of activities you can do to perk up
  • this website , which is an interactive guide to navigating hard times . Bookmark it for exam week!
  • Safety Plan, a crisis plan app (available for free on Android and Iphone) that keeps your personalized crisis plan in your back pocket.

Why Make A Crisis Plan?

Here are some reasons folks create their own crisis plans, if you’re still not convinced.

  • Crisis planning keeps you in control of what happens to you. Crisis can be a time that other folks step in and take control to make sure you’re safe. By documenting your wishes for when you’re in crisis, you can stay both empowered AND safe during hard times.
  • Crisis planning helps you learn more about yourself. The questions you need to ask yourself in the process of developing a crisis plan prompt you to develop a richer understanding of yourself, your mind, and your unique strengths.
  • Crisis planning is tool to communicate with your  support people. Emailing your crisis plan to your friends and family can start (or continue) a conversation about mental illness–a difficult topic–on your own terms. Crisis planning also demonstrates to those around you that you are taking care of yourself, and so it could help your mom worry less about you. (But no promises on that one!)
  • Crisis planning builds more self-reliant communities. Communities with disproportionately high rates of mental health crisis, like LGBTQ  folks, also have too many negative experiences with mental health professionals and histories of oppression in mental health fields. Crisis plans encourage conversation and collaboration about mental health support within marginalized communities, so that when folks from these communities reach out to professionals, they are also grounded in networks of  friends who understand their struggles and can advocate for them.
  • Finally, a crisis plan prepares you for scary times, and that makes them less scary! Knowing that you are ready for the worst times reminds you of your inner strength. A crisis plan serves as a reminder that you always have a path out of even the darkest spots.

If you’d like help planning for–or navigating–crisis, contact the Counseling Center.  If you’re having trouble keeping up with school work because of mental health issues, contact the office of the Dean of Students for support.  If you are  experiencing mental health crisis after-hours, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or text the Crisis Textline at 741741.

Anole Halper is a graduate intern with Student Wellness. They are getting a dual Masters in social work and public health. Their research interests include sexual violence prevention and LGBTQ health equity issues.