Student COVID Vaccination Update

The appointment booking site for UNC students and post-docs to sign up for on-campus vaccines launched Friday morning. All appointments for the first week’s allocation of 2,000 Johnson & Johnson vaccines were filled by Friday at 4pm.

Watch for Cancellations

UNC students and post-docs can watch for openings on the booking site in case of canceled appointments. The dates when appointments may open include Wednesday 3/31, Thursday 4/1, Monday 4/5 or Tuesday 4/6.

Future Availability

Campus Health will be notified by the Department of Health and Human Services on Thursdays of each week about vaccine dose allocation for the next week. Once notified of the UNC Chapel Hill allocation – which may vary from week to week – appointments will be opened based on that allocation.

We hope that our allocation for next week will be similar in size to our allocation this week.

Students should remain alert for an email about appointment scheduling which will be sent once the vaccine allocation has been confirmed. Due to the spring holiday weekend, new appointment slots will likely open around midday on Monday 4/5 for appointments beginning Wednesday 4/7.

Alternate Locations

Many off-campus vaccination sites are available. If you are seeking vaccination and do not want to wait to sign up, you can find an alternate vaccination location at https://myspot.nc.gov/


Access Denied

We are aware that students in Kenan-Flagler had issues logging into the Student COVID Vaccination Site. Those students receiving an Access Denied error can log-in using the following instructions:

  • Go to heelmail.unc.edu
  • Login with your UNC email address which should be: youronyen@ad.unc.edu
  • You will be prompted to enter the Microsoft verification code that is texted to you. If you have not set up your 2-step verification for Office 365, please go to this web page which will walk you through the steps: https://its.unc.edu/onyen-services/
  • Once you have logged into your heelmail account, go to the email that was sent with the link to the booking page (https://studentcovidvax.unc.edu/)
  • You should now be able to login to the booking site as you have logged into microsoft365 via your heelmail.
  • If you are still having difficulties, please contact the UNC Help Desk at 919-962-HELP.

How to Convince Someone to Get Vaccinated against COVID-19

There are oh-so-many reasons why some people might not be jumping to be vaccinated. To name a few: Fear of the government or the medical community. Indifference to the pandemic’s impacts. Misunderstandings about the vaccines. Lack of vaccine availability in their community.

All of these are understandable responses to a complex, politicized situation.

When you embark on a conversation with someone you think may not be excited to be vaccinated, remember that the goal isn’t to coerce – it’s to connect by creating a good conversational environment. Do the things we know help people feel heard and respected, which at its core means active listening. Dedicate the majority of your time to listening and understanding the other person’s perspective.

Start with asking questions to understand.

  • “What are you considering regarding getting vaccinated?”
  • “What information is important to you for making your decision about the vaccine?”
  • “What would need to change for you to be willing to get the vaccine?”

Listen and then listen some more.

Offer support and encouragement. Reflect feelings.

  • “I appreciate your honesty.”
  • “I can tell you are being thoughtful about this decision.”
  • “I see how strongly you feel about this.”

Highlight areas of agreement.

  • “I am looking forward to things being more normal too.”
  • “We both care about our community.”
  • “I agree – the pandemic has been divisive.”
  • “I too like to deeply understand decisions about my health.”

Ask more questions. Listen some more. Find more areas of agreement.

When you do these things, usually the other person will eventually get to a place where they are ready to listen to your perspective. It may not happen during the first conversation, and that’s ok too!

When it’s your turn, tell your story in a way that avoids making anyone feel defensive. In this case, perhaps how you first felt fear or hesitancy about the vaccine development or rollout, and then how you overcame those feelings to come to your current understanding. When you share your story, end it by turning the conversation back to the other person and their process. Seek to learn more about what they need and how you can support them.

  • “What about you? Have you had any experiences like that?”
  • “What does my story bring up for you?”

Often you won’t even have to ask a question because the other person will naturally launch into statements or stories of their own after hearing your story. That’s a great sign! Return to active listening, asking questions, reflecting, and connecting from there.

Before you part ways, connect and strengthen the relationship.

  • “I’m so glad we talked.”
  • “Can we check in again in a few weeks?”
  • “I really care about you.”

Remember, the best decision-making happens when someone is rational, open-minded and feels supported. Strategies like those mentioned above help to facilitate the kind of environment that could allow someone reconsider their ideas.

Go forth and ignite good conversations!

This article was adapted from political persuasion research by Karin Tamerius. Read more about compassionate political persuasion.

Week of Wellness 3/8-3/14

A long weekend is coming up and we hope you’re getting ready to do some things just for you. 

This week, UNC Human Resources is offering a Total Wellbeing Virtual Wellness Week, centered on the needs of faculty and staff but open to all people affiliated with UNC. From meditation to cooking demos to weights, there are lots of options to find connection with your mind, body and spirit. Several in-real-life activities are happening as well. Morrison Art studio is offering a paint supply giveaway, Campus Rec is offering a Swim Stroke Clinic and a zipline night this weekend, and they continue to offer — all by reservation.

Read some suggestions for healthy ways to enjoy your break by Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Amy Johnson. Here are some more health happenings, as compiled by our friends at Healthy Heels!

Tuesday 3/9
Core | 9 – 9:30 am
8 Financial Habits and Goal Setting | 11 – 11:50 a.m.
Practical Mobility Fitness Demo | 12 – 12:20 p.m.
Redefining Success: Tackling Failure in Leadership | 12 p.m.
Mediterranean Cooking Demo | 12:30 – 1:05 p.m.
Stress, Sleep and Immune Support | 1:15 – 2 p.m.
Self-Care Mindfulness Meditation | 4 – 4:30 p.m.
Cardio Dance | 4 – 4:30 p.m
How to Get Involved in Politics | 5:30 p.m.
Camp Gladiator | 5 – 6 p.m.
Nonbinary: A Deeper Dive | 6 p.m.
Tuesday CUAB Trivia | 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 3/10
Barre | 9 – 9:45 a.m.
Morrison Art Studio PaintSupply Giveaway | 10 a.m.
Flow | 11:15 am – 12 p.m.
Gentle Yoga | 12 – 12:30 p.m.
The Power of Plants Cooking Demo | 12:15 – 12:50 p.m.
The Art of Wellness: Creative Writing for Wellness | 1 p.m.
One Act Bystander Skills Workshop | 3- 5 p.m. 
Inhaling Positivity | 4 – 4:20 p.m.
Virtual Paint Night | 6 p.m.
Intro to Climbing | 6 p.m.

Thursday 3/11
Pilates for Better Living | 11:45 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.
Eating for Gut Health Educational Session | 12:30 – 1:20 p.m.
Restorative Yoga | 4 – 4:45 p.m.
Digital Art Workshop | 4 p.m.
CUAB Heartfelt Movie Day | all day

Friday 3/12
Mindful Breath and Movement | 9 – 9:30 a.m.
Twitch Talk: National Women’s History Month | 11 a.m.
Outdoor Wellness Programs and Guided Meditation | 12 – 12:20 p.m.
YogaReduce Stress and Anxiety through Breathwork | 4 – 4:45 p.m.
CUAB International Movie Day | all day

Saturday 3/13
Swim Stroke Clinics | 1 p.m.

Sunday 3/14
Fly the Carolina Sky | 5:30 p.m.

Health and Wellbeing Services this week

Carolina Together Testing Program is open for asymptomatic testing in all three locations (Union, CURRENT, Rams Head Rec) with regular hours through Thursday. Friday, all locations are closed. Saturday, regular hours. Sunday testing will be offered at the Union and CURRENT from 11 am – 2 pm.

Campus Health is open Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. and weekends from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. for telehealth and in-person visits. Phone support 24/7; the phone number becomes a nurse advice line after hours. Call for an appointment or advice: 919-966-2281.

CAPS offers 24/7 phone support at 919-966-3658. Initial screenings offered by phone 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. – 4.p.m. M-F. Follow up appointments by Zoom. Group therapy during spring semester includes over 20 groups to help you connect with students like you via Zoom. 

Campus Rec is open for in-person workout and climbing reservations at Rams Head and the SRC. In addition, they offer outdoor, distanced fitness classes as well as virtual classes both on-demand and live. Outdoor programs are also happening through Carolina Adventures.

Student Wellness provides virtual support, program requests, appointments and wellbeing interventions. Learn more at studentwellness.unc.edu.

I have an opportunity to get the vaccine but it’s not my turn. Should I take it?

We want everyone to be vaccinated when it’s your turn! And we know many of us are navigating the ethics of when to be vaccinated.

In an ideal world, the systems would be set up to create equity in vaccine order.

Our role as individuals is to:

  • Tell the truth, about
    • Health status
    • Work and volunteer requirements
    • Residence location, and
    • Priority level.
  • Avoid taking a dose that is clearly intended for others.

All of the vaccine requirements are self-reported. And many of us live in gray zones of the vaccine groupings. Draw on your best self when you answer the questions of eligibility. How would the most ethical person you can imagine respond to the questions?

If doses are truly going to waste and a vaccination provider is looking for arms, it’s okay to take a dose. You get some extra karma points if you instead try to connect those vaccines with someone who is higher priority.

This is a challenging time of scarce vaccines, variation between locations’ systems and rules, challenges to equitable access, and the emotions of our own and our loved ones’ safety. We trust you to do what’s right and are here to help if you have questions.

We anticipate that vaccine scarcity will diminish over the next few months, so if you can, be patient! Those who haven’t been vaccinated yet will have their spot coming soon.

Image by Danica Day @Danicady on Instagram

It’s #BeatDuke Week

Lotto to Watch in the Dean Dome

As North Carolina’s numbers have continued to show improvement and vaccine distribution increases, the state has eased some restrictions. The latest North Carolina guidance allows larger indoor arenas with a capacity of more than 5000 people to open at 15% capacity, as long as additional safety protocols are in place. These protocols include mask-wearing, assigned distanced seating, and a guest flow plan.

Two students wearing UNC gear and masks hold up finger "w"s in the Dean Dome
Photo of students at FSU game in Dean Dome by Chibby Ogu @ogu_chibby15 on Instagram

This shift means that students are eligible for in-person tickets to the UNC versus Duke home game on Saturday. Check your email for details from UNC Athletics.

Watch the Game from Afar

Even if you don’t win the lottery to attend or don’t feel comfortable attending an in-person event, a virtual watch party is happening.

Or you can set up your own virtual or in-person watch plan! The state still restricts indoor gatherings to 25 people and outdoor gatherings to 50 when not at a business or arena. While what you can do has changed, what you should do remains the same: outdoors is better than indoors, mask-wearing is better than unmasked, fewer people is better than more people. You need to find your own tolerance of risk, but the least risky option is to watch with your roommates and connect with others online.

Make your virtual celebration fun

UNC students wearing UNC gear with blue streamers, a UNC basketball player face cut-out and Franklin Street sign in their hallway.
Photo of roommates watching Duke game in February provided by Stephanie Marvin @stephanie_marvin on Instagram
  • Wear your favorite team colors. Paint your face. Get out your team pom poms.
  • Go big when setting up your viewing space:
    • Overzealously decorate in your team’s colors.
    • Ask to use your roommates’ monitors so you can collectively see online chatter, multiple camera angles, and your video-chatting friends all at the same time.
    • Make themed snacks.
  • Start a group text with your friends who are also fans.
  • Challenge your friends to create the most fun team-oriented TikTok.
  • Engage on Twitter, Reddit, or another online community space while you watch.

Risk Reduction for Small Gatherings

UNC students in Carolina gear sit outside under a blanket during the last UNC game against Duke
Photo of Duke game watching setup by Meredith Braddy @meredith.braddy on Instagram

We all know gathering with people outside your household adds risk. Avoid gatherings if you can. If you do get together with people who don’t live with you – here are ways to make it safer:

  • Talk about it. Have a conversation ahead of time to set expectations for the gathering.
  • Gather outdoors. It’s safer than gathering indoors. Use a projector to broadcast the game. If indoors, open windows and doors if possible.
  • Distance yourselves. Sit at least 6 feet away from people who don’t live with you. Avoid direct contact like hugs and high fives with those not from their household.
  • Wear masks with more than two layers over their nose and mouth that fits snugly against the sides of the face. Bring a spare mask (or a few) in case yours gets wet from moist breath or snow/rain, or if someone else forgets theirs.
  • Avoid shouting, cheering loudly, or singing. We get mad at Coach K too! Hold in those hollers and instead clap, stomp your feet or use handheld noisemakers.
  • Remember that people without symptoms as well as those with a recent negative test can still spread COVID.
  • Wash your hands often with soap for at least 20 seconds – especially after blowing your nose, coughing, sneezing, and visiting with others, as well as before eating.
  • Avoid touching your face including mask, eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • BYO food, drinks, and plates/cups/utensils (and mask!).
  • It’s ok to stay home. Do what’s best for you, and definitely stay home if you’re sick or have been near someone who thinks they may have been exposed.

And when we #BeatDuke, also #BeatCOVID by not rushing Franklin Street. Might we suggest instead going onto your porch or driveway, banging pots and pans, and yelling “Tar” and “Heel” back and forth with all of Chapel Hill?

#GoHeels #BeatDuke #BeatCOVID

Pandemic Fatigue

Student studying in the library with a superman sticker on his laptop and a tired look on his face
UNC undergraduate student Eli Grossman studies in Davis Library on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. November 19, 2020. (Jon Gardiner/UNC-Chapel Hill)

Life during a pandemic means making analyzing risks and benefits over and over again. It’s exhausting. We are constantly adapting to new policies and situations. Grocery shopping, going to class, chatting with your neighbors, traveling – they all require more thought and behavior monitoring than ever before. These mental efforts have costs. Plus as college students, we have a brief window to experience college life, a year of which has already been disrupted. Our ideas of how life at UNC should look are vastly different than the reality has been this past year.

There are plenty of systemic issues around the pandemic and life at UNC that should be addressed. Healthy Heels is one of the entities working amongst students, faculty, staff, and public health experts to improve the way UNC is navigating during the pandemic. You can help by advocating too!

In addition to those changes, we all have areas in our personal life that we can control that can help with pandemic fatigue.

Do things – just do them differently.

Students chat while sitting on the low stone walls of Polk Place on February 24, 2021, on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (Johnny Andrews/UNC-Chapel Hill)

Continue to follow preventative measures while still finding ways to live your lives. We are out of the “do not” phase of the pandemic at this point; now we are at “do differently.” Use the general COVID guidelines and creativity to find ways to make things fun and keep them safer. Mainly you want to reduce the amount of shared air between you and people outside your household. Key points are to:

  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth and/or keep your distance from other people
  • Find fresh air (ideally outdoors, otherwise well-ventilated indoor)
  • Limit the number of people
  • Reduce the length of time
  • Seek a vaccine when you’re eligible

Most of us recognize the considerations for COVID at this point of the pandemic. So the question becomes how to live life while taking those into account. Anything you can do to move interactions outside and limit the number of people will help!

  • OUTDOOR SPACES: Consider ways to find or improve outdoor areas that are comfortable for socializing in varied weather. Think about porches, decks, parks, gardens, river/lakeshores, trails, or natural areas. Remember that masks are required outside on campus whenever you are closer than 6 feet to someone.
  • CREATIVE OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES: Think of fun ways to enjoy your time outside together! Some ideas: hike, walk, disc golf, hang at a park, stargaze, bike, host a bonfire, boat, float, or go to an outdoor movie.
  • DATING: If you choose to date, be intentional! Find ways to get to know someone before meeting in person – including their COVID risks. When you start dating someone in real life, their risks will become your risks. If you don’t know if your date is seeing other people, assume they are. For the in-person dates, the same basic concepts apply – outdoors is better than indoors; masked is better than unmasked; fewer people is better than more people.
  • EATING/DRINKING: Eating or drinking around people you don’t live with adds risk because of the need to remove your mask to consume food and beverages. As above, the same basic concepts apply – outdoors is better than indoors; masked is better than unmasked; fewer people is better than more people. Find places to eat and drink where it’s just you and your friend(s) instead of being exposed to more of the community. Host a backyard picnic. Remember that alcohol or drugs consumed may impact your ability to make good choices for COVID prevention and otherwise, so opt out of substances or use them in a way or environment that ensures your and your community’s safety.
  • INDOOR EVENTS: Avoid them if you can! But if you do attend, wear a well-fitting, double-layered mask and do your best to ensure others will be masked as well. Keep your distance. Further guidance for indoor events available at the CDC.

Support your own mental health.

  • Find ways to stay connected with people who make you feel safe and supported.
  • Find hope. Remember that the decisions you make now will make you more resilient and stronger when the pandemic is over.
  • Practice positivity. We are doing the best we can under difficult circumstances. There are so many things to be grateful for! Try to find time each day to express that gratitude – whether over a meal with a roommate or in a gratitude journal.
  • Focus on what you can control. Determine what things add the most stress and set some healthy boundaries around them. Create a schedule or routine where you get 30 minutes just for you – every day. Focus on one or two things a day that you can accomplish for your wellbeing; these small things over time add up.
  • Cut yourself some slack. Be gentle with yourself; be gentle with your people. Pandemic life is hard, and hitting a wall is a very normal response to very abnormal circumstances.

A mental health professional can help support you in finding specific strategies that will work with your life. UNC students have free access to CAPS 24/7 at 919-966-3658.

You’re doing good things.

Know that every choice you make that helps reduce COVID-19 transmission risk helps our community stay safer and healthier. Most of us didn’t regularly wear facial coverings a year ago. Many of us didn’t understand the term “social distancing.” Once we understood these strategies reduced the likelihood of COVID-19 spread, many of us implemented them. We wear masks, keep our distance from each other and limit contact with people outside of our household. A big ol’ THANK YOU for all the ways you have shifted your daily life to support a healthier community.

How to support a roommate with mental health challenges

Many UNC students are struggling with stress, anxiety, and mental illness. Mental health concerns can make it even harder to manage the already significant challenges of being a Tar Heel.

As a roommate, you are in a unique position. You will likely have intimate knowledge of your roommate’s behavior and wellbeing, and you can be an important support system for this person you live with and care about. It is also important to take care of yourself and set boundaries while you support others. It’s a balancing act!

Together we can create a culture of care at UNC.

  1. Be considerate. Being a good roommate means being considerate of each other’s needs. This remains true when your roommate has anxiety, depression, an eating disorder, trauma history, or any type of mental illness.
  2. Communicate. Everyone’s experiences with mental health are unique – so step one is to communicate openly and kindly.
  3. Respect their privacy. Your living situation should feel like a safe place for you and your roommates to be authentic. The conversations and experiences that happen in your living situation should stay within your living situation. The only exception to this is when you’re worried about your roommate hurting themselves or others.
  4. Show you care. Ideas could include: make them dinner, pick up a shared living space, leave them a kind note, ask them to hang out, schedule time to do something they enjoy.
  5. Ask how to help. Find the right time to talk, one when they are well-rested, aren’t hangry, and generally seem like they are in a good place – and ask how you can support them when they are struggling. Some folks may have more trouble asking for what they need than others – so come to the conversation with ideas for suggestions.
  6. Encourage their wellbeing. Things that we know help wellbeing include a connection (that can be with you, and you can encourage them to reach out to more folks who care about them or a mental health pro), time outside, good sleep, nourishing food, body movement, activities that result in creativity and joy. Encourage them to do these activities. Even better, invite them to do them with you!
  7. Take care of yourself as well. Don’t take your roommate’s behavior personally – often their behavior will have little to do with you. Consider what you need to be successful and well. Sometimes it may mean being spending time away from your shared space. Sometimes it may mean meeting your needs first and then supporting your roommate. Take some time to check in with yourself on your capacity to help.
  8. Watch for worrisome changes. If you notice changes in mood, behavior, performance, appearance, or outlook that make you worried, talk about it. You can reach out to CAPS 24/7 to consult with professionals for the best way to support your friend by calling 919-966-3658. You can also talk to your roommate directly about what you’re noticing. Expressing your concern to them and encouraging them to seek help may be the first step in their healing. Focus on the specifics that are causing you concern. Listen and avoid judgment. If your roommate expresses a desire to hurt or kill themselves, seek help immediately.

If you are concerned about immediate safety

24 hours a day, 7 days a week:

Call   911

Come into CAPS or call  919-966-3658 

Contact the Dean of Students at   919-966-4042

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline   1-800-273-8255

Crisis Text Line Text START to 741-741

Thank you to our reader who suggested this blog topic! You can suggest blog topics as well – we love it when you do!

Pause. Reflect. Act.

Three simple words with a whole lot of power to make your wellness days – and time at UNC – more beneficial for you.

Pause. Take a moment. This could mean as small as stopping in the midst of something evoking strong feelings or as big as initiating a meditation practice. It could mean just taking a few deep breaths.

Pausing for a moment – or several – to separate ourselves a bit from what’s happening allows for us to regain sight of what’s important.

Reflect. This is the MOST IMPORTANT step to any growth or learning. You can read all the books, watch all the films, listen to all the podcasts, but without taking time to consider what you’ve learned afterwards, most lessons will be lost.

Reflect means to think deeply and carefully. Give yourself time to consider what you need and how you add value to your community. What motivates you? What brings you joy? How can you make space in your life for what’s important? What can you do to better meet your needs? How can you make space to have a positive impact on your community?

Act. Based on your reflection, take the first step to get what you need. Reach out to ask for help if you need it!

Happy Wellness Days Weekend!

Who’s got two thumbs and is excited for a long weekend?

Take time for YOU this weekend! This is a great time to give yourself a break, pace yourself, and manage your expectations. Take at least some time each day just for you. Some ideas based on the many activities available on and around campus are listed below that might meet your needs.

Thursday, February 11 

Friday, February 12 

Saturday, February 13 

Sunday, February 14 

Monday, February 15 

Tuesday’s February 16  

  • Reset and redesign your workspace
  • Volunteer with Carolina Community Garden. (3-5 p.m.) 
  • Carolina Basketball vs. Virginia Tech (6 p.m.) on ACC Network 
  • Celebrate Mardi Gras safely with takeout from Imbibe

ANYTIME during the weekend OR during Wellness Days 

Safer Game Watching

Hey team! Raise your giant foam finger if you love watching big sporting events with other fans.

It’s normal to feel a connection through collective cheering (or dislike of that team down the road). We love the energy that comes from spaces where lots of folks are hyped about what’s happening.

And we’re still in the midst of a pandemic. Choose a safer way to enjoy big games.

As we all likely know, the safest way to watch big games is to gather virtually or just with the people in your household.

Make your virtual celebration fun

  • Wear your favorite team colors. Paint your face. Get out your team pom poms.
  • Go big when setting up your viewing space:
    • Overzealously decorate in your team’s colors.
    • Ask to use your roommates’ monitors so you can collectively see online chatter, multiple camera angles, and your video-chatting friends all at the same time.
    • Make themed snacks.
  • Start a group text with your friends who are also fans.
  • Challenge your friends to create the most fun team-oriented TikTok.
  • Engage on Twitter, Reddit, or another online community space while you watch.
Otis will be Rameses XXII as Rameses XXI goes into retirement at the Hogan's Magnolia View Farm in Chapel Hill, NC. November 3, 2020. The Hogan family has been caretakers of the rams that have served as UNC’s mascot since 1924. (Jon Gardiner/UNC-Chapel Hill)

Risk Reduction for Small Gatherings

We all know gathering with people outside your household adds risk. Avoid gatherings if you can. If you do get together with people who don’t live with you – here are ways to make it safer:

  • Talk about it. Have a conversation ahead of time to set expectations for the gathering.
  • Gather outdoors. It’s safer than gathering indoors. Use a projector to broadcast the game. If indoors, open windows and doors if possible.
  • Distance yourselves. Sit at least 6 feet away from people who don’t live with you. Avoid direct contact like hugs and high fives with those not from their household.
  • Wear masks with more than two layers over their nose and mouth that fits snugly against the sides of the face. Bring a spare mask (or a few) in case yours gets wet from moist breath or snow/rain, or if someone else forgets theirs.
  • Avoid shouting, cheering loudly or singing. We get mad at Coach K too! Hold in those hollers and instead clap, stomp your feet or use handheld noisemakers.
  • Remember that people without symptoms as well as those with a recent negative test can still spread COVID.
  • Wash your hands often with soap for at least 20 seconds – especially after blowing nose, coughing, sneezing, and visiting with others, as well as before eating.
  • Avoid touching your face including mask, eyes, nose and mouth.
  • BYO food, drinks, and plates/cups/utensils (and mask!).
  • It’s ok to stay home. Do what’s best for you, and definitely stay home if you’re sick or have been near someone who thinks they may have been exposed.

And finally – we know rushing Franklin Street is a tradition after a win, but this is not the year to do it. Stay safe(r) and #GoHeels!