Medication Safety

Medication (3).pngCollege may be the first time you’re responsible for managing your health and medicines on your own. Here are 4 easy tips for using your medicines safely.

#1: Follow Directions
You hear it in your classes all the time, but following directions applies to your medicines too. Taking too much or too little of your medicine may make you sick. Be sure to use your medicines as directed – read the directions on the label and ask your healthcare provider how much you should take and when.

Use Medicines as Directed.

  • Read the directions on the label and ask your healthcare provider how much you should take and when.
  • Never skip taking your prescription medicine. Talk to your healthcare provider before you stop taking your medicines.
  • Only take the suggested dose.

Avoid Common Problems.

  • Don’t share medicines.
  • Don’t use medicine in the dark where you can’t see what you are taking.

#2: Ask Questions
Your professors encourage you to ask questions about assignments, so why not ask your
healthcare provider about your medicines? Campus Health Pharmacy and Student Stores Pharmacy can explain the facts about every medicine you take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medicines, and vitamins. They can tell you about any side effects or special warnings, and if there are any types of food you should avoid while taking the medicine.

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to tell you the facts about each medicine you take.

  • What is the name of the medicine?
  • What is the active ingredient(s)?
  • What is the medicine for?
  • How much do I take and when should I take it?
  • What does it look like?
  • When does it expire?
  • Are there any side effects or special warnings?
  • What should I do if I start having side effects?
  • Can I take it if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?
  • What other medicines or foods should I avoid?

#3: Do Not Use Expired Medicine
Just like that yogurt that’s been sitting in the back of your fridge, your medicines expire too. Check the box or the prescription label for the expiration date before taking any medicine, or dietary supplement. Expired medicines may not work or may make you sick. If you’re unsure of a medicine’s expiration, just ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist! They can help make sure all of your medicines are safe to take.

#4: Store Safely
It may be convenient to keep your medicines in plain sight to help remember to take them, but it’s important to store medicines safely. Put your medicines away after each use, and keep them out of sight. Medicines can cause harm if taken by the wrong person.

Ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist how you should get rid of unused medicines. Find out if you should:

  • flush it down the toilet or sink.
  • put it in a sealed plastic bag with coffee grounds or kitty litter and throw it in the trash.
  • drop it off at a drug take-back program in your community.

Be sure to scratch off your name and personal information before you put empty pill bottles in the trash.

Make sure that children can’t get to medicines including patches that you put in the trash.

If you are a UNC community member and have questions about your medication, call Campus Health Pharmacy at 919-966-6554.

 

We’ve got jobs, yes we do! We’ve got jobs, how ’bout you?

We’re hiring! That’s right – YOU. Could work. For us!

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So if you’re into health and wellness  – check out the paid, part-time, temporary paraprofessional staff gigs for the 2017-2018 academic year.  Current open positions (and number available) include:.

For folks with an undergraduate degree:

Program Assistant (7 positions open)

Program Assistant- UNC Men’s Project (1 position open)

Program Assistant- Bystander Education (1 position open)

These positions are ideal for current graduate students in Public Health, Social Work, Psychology, Higher Education, Health Communication, or related fields.  Positions are 15-20 hours per week unless otherwise listed, and anticipated start date is August 7, 2017. To apply please see positions descriptions for links to postings on UNC’s HR website.  Please note that you may need to create an account on this system in order to apply, as it is does not use onyen or PID log in.  Open opportunities require a Bachelor of Arts or Sciences degree from a nationally accredited institution. Graduate degree in progress is preferred, not required.

For folks who will be a UNC undergrad in 2017-2018:

Photography / Videography Intern

This position is ideal for a current or incoming undergraduate student with experience in photography and videography, along with an interest in supporting health and wellness at UNC. This is a shared position between Campus Health Services and Student Wellness. To apply, submit a single pdf with your cover letter, resume, 3 references, and a few links and/or images that showcase your photography/videography work.

 

Supporting Healthy Bodies at UNC: Navigating Obesity, Eating Disorders, and Weight Bias

When discussing health, you’ll notice a trend between two approaches – weight normative and weight inclusive.

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Screenshot from American Heart Association, 1/25/2015

The weight-normative approach includes the many principles and practices that emphasize achieving a “normal” weight when defining health and well-being. This approach rests on the assumption that weight and disease are related in a linear fashion, with disease and weight increasing in tandem. Under the weight-normative approach, personal responsibility to make “healthy lifestyle choices” and maintain “healthy weights” are emphasized.  The approach prioritizes weight as a main determinant of health and as such, weight management (calories in/calories out) as a central component of health improvement and health care recommendations.

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Photo Credit: Prevention Magazine

Instead of imagining that well-being is only possible at a specific weight, a weight-inclusive approach includes research-informed practices that enhance people’s health regardless of where they fall on the weight spectrum. Under this paradigm, weight is not a focal point of treatment or intervention. Instead the weight-inclusive approach focuses on health behaviors that can be made more accessible to all people. These are behaviors such as exercising for pleasure, eating when hungry and stopping when full.

So is one better than the other? We’ll look at three questions to figure that out:

Continue reading

We’re hiring!

searsteambuildingDo you have what it takes to be a paid Healthy Heel? We are seeking 2 undergraduate student employees with creative experience for 10 hours per week of paid work from May 2017 – May 2018 or August 2017 – May 2018. If you are fun, engaged, collaborative and ready to gain experience spreading health on campus, click below to learn more.

Videography / Photography Intern

Graphic Design Intern

 

Setting up Patterns for Sleep Success

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Patterns. Sleep is all about patterns – we do it every single night, and our ability to sleep relies on the patterns we create with our daily lives. What else do you do every day that you could shift to help your sleep become a more regular pattern?

  • Exercise routine: A tired body usually means a tired mind. Make it a goal to move your body every single day.
  • Meditation: The main requirement of meditation? Focusing your thoughts – either on your breath or a mantra, something simple, like “I will be more mindful.” Beyond that – the where and the how long and pretty much everything else is up to you. Even a few minutes a day can help. Schedule it in – perhaps first thing when you wake up and right before you fall asleep. You can even meditate in your bed – that’s absolutely allowed.
  • Eat a variety of nutrient dense, processed-as-little-as-possible foods. These are less likely to have caffeine nor high amounts of sugar and are more likely to nourish your body the way it needs.
  • Create a routine of when you go to bed and wake up. College makes this difficult, but really – we all could use more regular sleep and wake times. Ideally this includes weekends as well. Is there a wake time you could imagine working for your weekdays and weekends? Try it out for a week and see how it goes.
  • Create a sleep sanctuary. What’s your bedroom like? Cool it down at night, try to keep it quiet (now’s a great time to try earplugs and white noise at night if you have loud roommates), keep it dark (a sleep mask or blackout curtains might help!). Do anything you can to make your bedroom a place of relaxation and relief from the stress of the outside world.

What do you do right before you try to fall asleep?

  • Screen use just before bed: consider installing a filter to add red to the visual. Research has shown that blue lights of screens can mess with our brains, where the red filter helps our brain think of sunsets and sleep.  Or consider keeping all screens out of your bedroom. Make your room a space reserved for sleep.
  • Exercise just before bed: consider doing more flow yoga or a chill walk just before bed and scheduling your hardcore cardio and lifting to earlier in the day or early evening. But – your bigger priority should be to get exercise at some time each day. Movement helps our bodies be tired and ready to sleep.
  • Good options before bedtime: book reading, meditation, writing down things from the day that are running through your brain so you don’t have to think about them anymore, really any sleep routine. A good example of a sleep routine? Take a warm shower, put on pajamas, brush your teeth, read a chapter of a good novel, earplugs in, sleep mask on, nightymcnightpants.

After you have put in some effort into sleep hygiene (that’s a real term describing steps like those above), and you’re still having trouble, come see a provider at Campus Health. Some providers may recommend further changes to sleep hygiene, medication, or the use of a phone app (CBT-i Coach on Play and iTunes), which can be used alone and in conjunction with a medical provider to improve your sleep. Make an appointment at CHS to learn more.

 

Photo credit: Gabriel Gonzalez, Flickr Creative Commons